Licence to Disturb Bats or Otters or their Breeding or Resting Places

Bats

All bats are listed on Annex IV of the EU Habitats Directive.  The domestic legislation that implements this Directive gives strict protection to individual bats and their breeding and resting places.

Where a proposed development will affect a site known to be used by bats, consideration needs to be given to the likely impact on the population(s).  Even when planning permission is given, or the activity does not require such permission, the wildlife legislation applies; bats and their breeding and resting places are still protected.  For further details and guidance on the protection of bats during development you are referred to Irish Wildlife Manual No 25:  Kelleher, C. & Marnell, F. (2006) Bat mitigation guidelines for Ireland. [2,765KB]

Article 16 of the Habitats Directive provides for derogations.  These may be issued  "provided there is no satisfactory alternative and the derogation is not detrimental to the maintenance of the populations of the species concerned at a favourable conservation status".

Applications for a derogation licence should be made in writing, including survey results and proposed mitigation measures, to:

Wildlife Licensing Unit,
National Parks and Wildlife Service,
Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht,
7 Ely Place,
Dublin 2.
 
Email: wildlifelicence@ahg.gov.ie
Tel: (01) 888 3242
 

Note that if the proposed activity can be timed, organised and carried out so as to avoid committing offences under Irish wildlife legislation and the EU Habitats Regulations, then no derogation is required.

Capturing and marking bats for research purposes is covered by the Wildlife Acts (1976 and 2000).

 

Bats in Houses

What to do if you find bats in your home

In the vast majority of cases, no action is required. However, if the bats are giving rise to concern, you should liaise with the NPWS by contacting wildlifelicence@ahg.gov.ie and provide details of the address where the bats are present. These details will be forwarded to your local NPWS Conservation Ranger who will, in due course, arrange to carry out a site visit to assess the situation.

Bats in Houses leaflet - download 

Otters

The otter is listed on Annex IV of the EU Habitats Directive.  The domestic legislation that implements this directive gives strict protection to individual otters and their breeding and resting places.

Where a proposed development will affect a site known to be used by otters, consideration needs to be given to the likely impact on the population.  Even when planning permission is given, or the activity does not require such permission, the wildlife legislation applies; otters and their breeding and resting places are still protected.

The Otter in Ireland leaflet - download

Article 16 of the Habitats Directive provides for derogations.  These may be issued  "provided there is no satisfactory alternative and the derogation is not detrimental to the maintenance of the populations of the species concerned at a favourable conservation status".

Applications for a derogation licence should be made in writing, including survey results and proposed mitigation measures, to:

Wildlife Licensing Unit,
National Parks and Wildlife Service,
Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht,
7 Ely Place,
Dublin 2.
 
Email: wildlifelicence@ahg.gov.ie
Tel: (01) 888 3242
 

Note that if the proposed activity can be timed, organised and carried out so as to avoid committing offences under Irish wildlife legislation and the EU Habitats Regulations, then no derogation is required.

Capturing and marking otters for research purposes is covered by the Wildlife Acts (1976 and 2000). Capture/Kill Protected Wild Animals for Educational or Scientific Purposes are issued to allow for capture and  To Mark or Ring Birds or Wild Animals cover marking. Applicants will be required to justify their research and to prove competency to carry out the proposed investigations.